What is Diplocon?

Diplocon was founded to provide resources for people seeking jobs providing construction services to the Diplomatic Community. While continuing to do so, it has also evolved into a nexus for employment professionals and consultants, job seekers interested in employment OCONUS (Outside CONtinental United States) in any field, and people already OCONUS whether working in the diplomatic realm, construction, maintenance, and support of diplomatic facilities, or in other professions and roles.

Archive for 2011

Oct
23

Teaching English Overseas

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As the “Western World” continues to struggle with poor economies, the eastern Pacific Rim is doing quite well. Even though there are still good jobs in the countries with tough economies, for those of  you trying to break into overseas work to gain experience and build your overseas resume, teaching English as a second language may be a good option. There are generally plenty of openings in the TESL
(Teaching English as a Second Language) field in East Asia.

Go to Google or any other search engine, enter TESL, and follow the links to resources for acquiring TESL skills (does not require a teaching degree and can be completed in months not years) and agencies that hire teachers.

Good Luck

Jun
04

The coming economic crash?

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How many times have we heard predictions that the dollar is going to collapse, the US economy will fail, and therefore we wonder if planning for our financial future might be futile, so why bother? I remember hearing the same sort of stories in the 90’s. In fact, remember the Y2K Bug? Our financial system was supposed to collapse and we were all going to be living in a barter system in which there would be no banks or currency at all? No government, no infrastructure, real back to the Stone Age sort of stuff.

Well, we partied like it was 1999 and made it through that disaster (as it was portrayed before it failed to occur), and we will make it through the next, so maybe we had better consider that there just might be a future after all.

Wealth generation and financial planning are alive and well – they just may require a little more diligence and knowledge than at times in the past before the easy money dot coms became dot bombs, and then the real estate bubble burst and wiped away a boatload of wealth seemingly overnight.

Americans working overseas usually have more investible income than the folks back in the US so need to be watchful for places to put their money to grow it and protect it.

Ric Edelman’s No Nonsense System for Building Wealth is an easy to understand, easy to use program that has helped this Diplocon Consultant implement automatic investment and retirement funding, and protect his financial future.

As in any area of life, you need to have goals and targets for your finances. You need to be able to monitor results and know if and when to make a move with your money (actually, a lot less often than many so-called financial experts would lead you to believe).

Edelman will help you understand mutual funds, index funds, insurance, retirement planning and even such unthinkable – but absolutely necessary – things as long term care and estate planning. He may even help you get enthused about it all so you will do it for your own good and that of your family.

Click on the link below and look through the available programs and you’ll find Ric Edelman and plenty of other authors/presenters to get you on your way to financial security or progress in most any area of your life.

I challenge you to make the effort to live your life to the fullest while working in the wider world OCONUS.

Greg


http://nightingale.directtrack.com/z/11625/CD719


Please note that we receive a small commission if you buy Nightingale-Conant products via our website, but that in no way diminishes the value, or adds to the cost of these excellent programs. We have used these products for years and recommended them because they have helped us deliver results in our lives.

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May
22

Ten tips for seeking overseas jobs.

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Ten tips for seeking overseas jobs.

1. Keep your nose clean – and don’t put any controlled substances in it!

Some of the best jobs require security clearance. A police record can cause delays in your clearance being approved. Delinquent taxes and child support payments can cause delays and must be resolved before a clearance will be approved.

2. Major in one trade, skill, or profession, and minor in another.

Having a second set of skills may mean the difference between you and the other candidates. This may contradict convention for domestic work where specialization is the current buzzword, but companies operating overseas are more likely to need you to wear more than one hat.

3. Don’t pay a lot up for any job search services.

Some years ago, when trying to break into the overseas job market, Diplocon consultant Greg paid a resume “blasting” service $750 to send his resume to what they claimed were hundreds of overseas employers. All he received in response was other job seekers replying. Somehow the blasting service just spammed hundreds of job seekers emails. A total waste (except the lesson learned).

4. Be willing to start at the bottom.

Get your foot in the door then make yourself indispensible – the big money will follow.

5. Know your target.

Know the company you send your resume to. View their website. Know their corporate culture. Mention a key aspect in your cover letter.

6. Update your skills.

Keep up with developments in your field and be ready to respond intelligently to questions about it.

7. Remember that your resume is a sales letter – not an autobiography.

The hiring manager is not looking for nice people or those with interesting hobbies. They are looking to add the company’s profit. If the job is in a less than desirable area, it may be good to mention that you can entertain yourself  by reading or some other activity to indicate that you are capable of maintaining your own morale. Don’t go overboard telling them you love to travel – they will be sending you to work, not to be a tourist.

8. Find forums to watch for activity in many areas both geographic and industry.

Do a web search for groups and forums related to your work, and the parts of the world you would like to work in. You are encouraged to go to http://diplocon.com and begin a forum of your own, and tell your friends and colleagues about it so they will participate. Networking can be a big part of finding the good jobs out there.

9. If no marketable skill now, think again.

There are overseas jobs available in many skill areas and professions. If you are competent with the English language, you can find jobs teaching. Some training is required but can be done while you are working your full time job. Perform a web search for “teaching English as a second language”, or TESL.

10. Don’t give up.

You may have to work at finding an overseas job, but it will be worth it. You may double or triple your income very quickly.

Apr
28

We can be targets of kidnappers

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Those of us working in the wider world, even though we are not rich by our own standards, may be by the standards of the culture in which we currently live. The Stratfor article below provides some good info about kidnapper’s motives and  methods.


The Kaspersky Kidnapping – Lessons Learned

By Scott Stewart

On April 24, officers from the anti-kidnapping unit of Moscow’s Criminal Investigation Department and the Russian Federal Security Service (FSB) rescued 20-year-old Ivan Kaspersky from a dacha in Sergiev Posad, a small town about 40 miles northeast of Moscow. Kaspersky, the son of Russian computer software services billionaire Eugene Kaspersky (founder of Kaspersky Lab), was kidnapped on April 19 as he was walking to work from his Moscow apartment. A fourth-year computer student at Moscow State University, Kaspersky was working as an intern at a software company located near Moscow’s Strogino metro station.

Following the abduction, Kaspersky was reportedly forced to call his father and relay his captors’ demands for a ransom of 3 million euros ($4.4 million). After receiving the ransom call, the elder Kaspersky turned to Russian law enforcement for assistance. On April 21, news of the abduction hit the Russian and international press, placing pressure on the kidnappers and potentially placing Kaspersky’s life in jeopardy. In order to defuse the situation, disinformation was leaked to the press that a ransom had been paid, that Kaspersky had been released unharmed and that the family did not want the authorities involved. Kaspersky’s father also contacted the kidnappers and agreed to pay the ransom. Responding to the ruse, four of the five members of the kidnapping gang left the dacha where Kaspersky was being held to retrieve the ransom and were intercepted by Russian authorities as they left. The authorities then stormed the dacha, arrested the remaining captor and released Kaspersky. The five kidnappers remain in custody and are awaiting trial.

According to Russia’s RT television network, Russian officials indicated that the kidnapping was orchestrated by an older couple who were in debt and sought to use the ransom to get out of their financial difficulties. The couple reportedly enlisted their 30-year-old son and two of his friends to act as muscle for the plot. Fortunately for Kaspersky, the group that abducted him was quite unprofessional and the place where he was being held was identified by the cell phone used to contact Kaspersky’s father. Reports conflict as to whether the cell phone’s location was tracked by the FSB, the police anti-kidnapping unit or someone else working for Kaspersky’s father, but in any case, in the end the group’s inexperience and naivete allowed for Kaspersky’s story to have a happy ending.

However, the story also demonstrates that even amateurs can successfully locate and abduct the son of a billionaire, and some very important lessons can be drawn from this case.

The Abduction

According to the Russian news service RIA Novosti, Kaspersky’s abductors had been stalking him and his girlfriend for several months prior to the kidnapping. This pre-operational surveillance permitted the kidnappers to determine Kaspersky’s behavioral patterns and learn that he did not have any sort of security detail protecting him. Media reports also indicate that the kidnappers were apparently able to obtain all the information they required to begin their physical surveillance of the victim from information Kaspersky himself had posted on Vkontakte.ru, a Russian social networking site. According to RT, Kaspersky’s Vkontakte profile contained information such as his true name, his photo, where he was attending school, what he was studying, who he was dating, where we was working for his internship and even the addresses of the last two apartments where he lived.

Armed with this cornucopia of information, it would be very easy for the criminals to establish physical surveillance of Kaspersky in order to gather the additional behavioral information they needed to complete their plan for the abduction. Kaspersky also appears to have not been practicing the level of situational awareness required to detect the surveillance being conducted against him — even though it was being conducted by amateurish criminals who were undoubtedly clumsy in their surveillance tradecraft. This lack of awareness allowed the kidnappers to freely follow him and plot his abduction without fear of detection. Kaspersky made himself an easy target in a dangerous place for high net worth individuals and their families. While kidnapping for ransom is fairly rare in the United States, Russian law enforcement sources report that some 300 people are kidnapped for ransom every year in Russia.

Denial

In terms of being an easy target, Kaspersky was not alone. It is not uncommon for the children of high net worth families to want to break free of their family’s protective cocoon and “live like a regular person.” This means going to school, working, dating and living without being insulated from the world by the security measures in place around their parents and their childhood homes. This tendency was exemplified by the well-publicized example of George W. Bush’s twin daughters “ditching” their Secret Service security details so they could go out and party with their friends when they were in college.

Having personally worked as a member of an executive protection detail responsible for the security of a high net worth family, I have seen firsthand how cumbersome and limiting an executive protection detail can be — especially a traditional, overt-security detail. A low-key, “bubble-type” detail, which focuses on surveillance detection and protective intelligence, provides some space and freedom, but it, too, can be quite limiting and intrusive — especially for a young person who wants some freedom to live spontaneously. Because of the very nature of protective security, there will inevitably be a degree of tension between personal security and personal freedom.

However, when reacting to this tension, those protected must remember that there are very real dangers in the world — dangers that must be guarded against. Unfortunately, many people who reject security measures tend to live in a state of denial regarding the potential threats facing them, and that denial can land them in trouble. We have seen this mindset most strongly displayed in high net worth individuals who have recently acquired their wealth and have not yet been victimized by criminals. A prime example of this was U.S billionaire Eddie Lampert, who at the time of his abduction in 2003 did not believe there was any threat to his personal security. His first encounter with criminals was a traumatic kidnapping at gunpoint. But this mindset can also appear in younger members of well-established families of means who have not personally been victimized by criminals.

It is important to realize, however, that the choice between security and freedom does not have to be an either/or equation. There are measures that can be taken to protect high net worth individuals and children without employing a full protective security detail. These same measures can also be applied by people of more modest means living in places such as Mexico or Venezuela, where the kidnapping threat is pervasive and extends to almost every strata of society, from middle-class professionals and business owners to farmers.

In this type of environment, the threat also applies to mid-level corporate employees who serve tours as expatriate executives in foreign cities. Some of the cities they are posted in are among the most crime-ridden in the world, including such places as Mexico City, Caracas, Sao Paulo and Moscow. When placed in the middle of an impoverished society, even a mid-level executive or diplomat is, by comparison, incredibly rich. As a result, employees who would spend their lives under the radar of professional criminals back home in the United States, Canada or Europe can become prime targets for kidnapping, home invasion, burglary and carjacking in their overseas posts.

The Basics

Before anything else can be done to address the criminal threat, like any other issue, the fact that there is indeed a threat must first be recognized and acknowledged. As long as a potential target is in a state of denial, very little can be done to protect him or her.

Once the threat is recognized, the next step in devising a personal protection system is creating a realistic baseline assessment of the threat — and exposure to that threat. This assessment should start with some general research on crime and statistics for the area where the person lives, works or goes to school, and the travel corridors between these places. The potential for natural disasters, civil unrest — and in some cases the possibility of terrorism or even war — should also be considered. Based on this general crime-environment assessment, it might be determined that the kidnapping risk in a city such as Mexico City or Moscow will dictate that a child who has a desire to attend university without a protective security detail might be better off doing so in a safer environment abroad.

Building on these generalities, then, the next step should be to determine the specific threats and vulnerabilities by performing some basic analyses and diagnostics. In some cases, these will have to be performed by professionals, but they can also be undertaken by the individuals themselves if they lack the means to hire professional help. These analyses should include:

  • In-depth cyberstalking report. Most of the people for whom we have conducted such reports have been shocked to see how much private information analysts are able to dig up on the Internet. This information is available for free (or for a few dollars) to anyone, including criminals, who might be targeting people for kidnapping, extortion or other crimes. The problem of personal information being available on the Internet is magnified when potential targets gratuitously post personal information online, as in the Kaspersky case. Even in cases where personal information is available only to online “friends,” it is quite easy for savvy Internet users to use a false social networking account with an attractive photo to social engineer their way into a circle of friends using common pretexting tactics. Therefore, potential targets need to be extremely careful what they post online, and they also must be aware of what information about them is publicly available on the Internet and how that information may make them vulnerable to being targeted. If it is determined that the information available makes them too vulnerable, changes may have to be made.
  • Baseline surveillance diagnostics. Surveillance diagnostics is a blend of surveillance-detection techniques that are designed to determine if an individual is under systematic criminal surveillance. This can be conducted by the potential targets themselves, if they receive the necessary training, or by a specialized professional surveillance-detection team. As the name suggests, this diagnostic level helps establish a baseline from which to plan future security and surveillance-detection operations.
  • Route analysis. This type of analysis examines the regular travel routes of a potential target in order to identify locations such as choke points that can be used by criminals for surveillance or to conduct an attack. Route analysis can be performed by the same team that conducts surveillance diagnostics, or even by a potential target if the person will thoughtfully examine his or her daily travel routes. Such an analysis allows the potential target to be cognizant of such locations and of the need to increase situational awareness for signs of surveillance or a potential attack as he or she passes through them — especially during a highly predictable move like the morning home-to-work commute.
  • Physical security surveys. Such surveys are performed for the home, workplace or school of the potential target. While individuals can effectively conduct such surveys using common sense, a professional assessment can be useful and will often be performed for free by alarm companies. Obviously, any security upgrades required at a workplace or school will require coordination with the security managers for these locations.
  • Response capability assessment. This is a realistic assessment of the capabilities and responsiveness of the local police and security forces as well as fire and medical first-responders. In some places, security personnel themselves may be involved in criminal activity, or prove to be generally unresponsive or incompetent. Knowing their true capabilities is necessary to create a realistic security plan.

There are some very good private training facilities that can provide individuals with training in things like attack recognition/avoidance, surveillance detection and route analysis as well hands-on skills like tactical driving.

Guns Alone Are Not the Answer

Even if a potential target is being afforded a protection detail, it must be remembered that guards with guns are not in and of themselves a guarantee of security. If a group is brazen enough to undertake a kidnapping, they will in many cases and many places not hesitate to use deadly force in the commission of their crime. If they are given free rein to conduct pre-operational surveillance, they will be able to make plans to overcome any security measures in place, including the neutralizing of armed security personnel.

After recognizing that a threat indeed exists, the next key concept that potential targets need to internalize is that criminals are vulnerable to detection as they plan their crimes, and that ordinary people can develop the skills required to detect criminal activity and take measures to avoid being victimized. The fact is, most criminals practice terrible surveillance tradecraft. They are permitted to succeed in spite of their lack of skill because, for the most part, people simply do not practice good situational awareness.

The good news for potential targets is that being aware of one’s surroundings and identifying potential threats and dangerous situations is more a mindset or attitude than a hard skill. Because of this, situational awareness is not something that can be practiced only by highly trained government agents or specialized surveillance detection teams — it is something that can be practiced by anyone with the will and the discipline to do so. In the Kaspersky case, it is very likely that had the young man been practicing good situational awareness, he would have been able to note the criminals conducting surveillance on him and to take appropriate action to avoid being kidnapped.

Armed guards, armored vehicles and other forms of physical security are all valuable protective tools, but they can all be defeated by kidnappers who are allowed to form a plan and execute it at the time and place of their choosing. Clearly, a way is needed to deny kidnappers the advantage of striking when and where they choose or, even better, to stop a kidnapping before it can be launched. This is where the intelligence tools outlined above come into play. They permit the potential target, and any security officers working to protect them, to play on the action side of the action/reaction equation rather than passively waiting for something to happen.




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Apr
04

Sprinkler fitters

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Sprinkler fitters overseas

What do sprinkler fitters do overseas that they don’t so much in the USA? In general, not a lot. Sprinkler fitters on an overseas jobsite are likely to do about the same things they do in the US, but may face greater challenges. They’re likely to face shortages of materials and supplies. If the project is in a phase in which there is not a lot of need for sprinkler fitters, they can fill in as helpers to the carpenters, electricians, etc. instead of being temporarily laid off. However, their wage will normally not fall to that of a helper.

Most journeyman level sprinkler fitters will have all the background required to earn top pay overseas, but may be required to adapt their skills to existing conditions. In some parts of the world, code compliant materials, familiar tools, and supplies are weeks away so the ability to look ahead and plan the work is a critical asset.

How can you acquire or polish sprinkler fitter skills for assignments overseas?

If you have no professional experience as a sprinkler fitter, you can start by going to a community college or trade school near your home. If that is not an option, you can take an online course (do a web search for online technical training – you may need to search for plumbing and welding courses). Even experienced sprinkler fitters that have learned on the job can benefit from such courses. Hiring Managers for overseas jobs or projects like to see some documentation of training. Hiring for overseas work is an intensive effort on the employer’s part because they will be investing thousands of dollars in you before you earn a penny for them.

You can also work your way up through union apprenticeship programs or on the job as an apprentice if there are no union facilities near you.

Whether you are an experienced sprinkler fitter or are in training, you should focus on being proficient and quality oriented in at least the following:

  • Layout and installation risers, main, and branch lines
  • Installing arm-overs and heads in very crowded spaces
  • Installation of correct rated heads
  • Local and national code compliance
  • Focus on commercial and institutional systems
  • Maintenance and trouble shooting

For more information or guidance email info@diplocon.com and/or sign up to join our email community and we will be glad to help.

Mar
30

Plumbers

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Plumbers overseas 

What do plumbers do overseas that they don’t so much in the USA? In general, not a lot. plumbers on an overseas jobsite are likely to do about the same things they do in the US, but may face greater challenges. They’re likely to face shortages of materials and supplies. If the project is in a phase in which there is not a lot of need for plumbers, they can fill in as helpers to the carpenters, electricians, etc. instead of being temporarily laid off. However, their wage will normally not fall to that of a helper.

Most journeyman level plumbers will have all the background required to earn top pay overseas, but may be required to adapt their skills to existing conditions. In some parts of the world, code compliant materials, familiar tools, and supplies are weeks away so the ability to look ahead and plan the work is a critical asset.

How can you acquire or polish plumber skills for assignments overseas?

If you have no professional experience as a plumber, you can start by going to a community college or trade school near your home. If that is not an option, you can take an online course (do a web search for online technical training). Even experienced plumbers that have learned on the job can benefit from such courses. Hiring Managers for overseas jobs or projects like to see some documentation of training. Hiring for overseas work is an intensive effort on the employer’s part because they will be investing thousands of dollars in you before you earn a penny for them.

You can also work your way up through union apprenticeship programs or on the job as an apprentice if there are no union facilities near you.

Whether you are an experienced plumber or are in training, you should focus on being proficient and quality oriented in at least the following:

  • Layout and installation of supply, waste, and vent lines
  • Installation of fixtures
  • Local and national code compliance
  • Focus on commercial and institutional systems
  • Maintenance and trouble shooting 

For more information or guidance email info@diplocon.com and/or sign up to join our email community and we will be glad to help.

Mar
21

Electrician Skills

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Ok, what do electricians do overseas that they don’t so much in the USA? In general, not a lot. Electricians on an overseas jobsite are likely to do about then same things they do in the US, but may face greater challenges. They’re likely to face shortages of materials and supplies. If the project is in a phase in which there is not a lot of need for electricians, they can fill in as helpers to the carpenters, plumbers, etc. instead of being temporarily laid off. However, their wage will normally not fall to that of a helper.

Most journeyman level electricians will have all the background required to earn top pay overseas, but may be required to adapt their skills to existing conditions. In some parts of the world, code compliant materials, familiar tools, and supplies are weeks away so the ability to look ahead and plan the work is a critical asset.

How can you acquire or polish electrician skills for assignments overseas?

If you have no professional experience as an electrician, you can start by going to a community college or trade school near your home. If that is not an option, you can take an online course (do a web search for online technical training). Even experienced electricians that have learned on the job can benefit from such courses. Hiring Managers for overseas jobs or projects like to see some documentation of training. Hiring for overseas work is an intensive effort on the employer’s part because they will be investing thousands of dollars in you before you earn a penny for them.

You can also work your way up through union apprenticeship programs or on the job as an apprentice if there are no union facilities near you.

Whether you are an experienced electrician or are in training, you should focus on being proficient and quality oriented in at least the following:

  • Layout and installation of conduit runs in commercial applications (accurate bending is critical as it can be difficult to acquire conduit and bodies to make up for mistakes).
  • Installation and wiring of distribution panels
  • Underground supply systems
  • High voltage systems
  • Low voltage systems
  • Back-up generator systems
  • Logic systems
  • Lightning arresting systems
  • Motor wiring
  • HVAC systems supply wiring
  • Local and national code compliance

 For more information or guidance email info@diplocon.com and/or sign up to join our email community and we will be glad to help.

Mar
05

Carpenters Skills

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I will begin with carpenters since I began my career overseas as a carpenter.

Ok, what do they do overseas that they don’t so much in the USA? In general, a lot. Carpenters on an overseas jobsite are likely to wear several different hats over course of a project. They’re likely to be the first trade called in and the last to leave. That is not much different from the USA but their roles can be – it is better to be a generalist than to be overly specialized. Often, if the project is in a phase in which there is not a lot of need for carpenters, they will fill in as helpers to the electricians, plumbers, etc. instead of being temporarily laid off. However, their wage will normally not fall to that of a helper.

Some journeyman level carpenters will have all the background required to earn top carpenter pay overseas, but may be required to adapt their skills to existing conditions. I was a finishes supervisor on a project in West Africa, and worked with a pair of highly trained brothers that would consistently tell me that it was impossible to do the work required with the tools and materials available. I could tell they were probably excellent craftsmen when given everything they requested to work with, but in that part of the world, familiar materials, tools, and supplies are weeks away or simply not going to be available so less experienced , but adaptable carpenters would have been a more valuable asset. If you have basic skills, know the importance of basics like line, level, plumb, and square, and, can remain flexible there may overseas jobs in your future if you desire.

How can you acquire or polish carpentry skills for assignments overseas?

If you have no professional carpentry experience you can start by going to a community college or trade school near your home. If that is not an option, you can take an online course (do a web search for online technical training). Even experienced carpenters that have learned on the job can benefit from such courses. Hiring Managers for overseas jobs or projects like to see some documentation of training. Hiring for overseas work is an intensive effort on the employer’s part because they will be investing thousands of dollars in you before you earn a penny for them.

You can also work your way up through union apprenticeship programs or on the job training.

Whether you are an experienced carpenter or are in training, you should focus on being proficient and quality oriented in at least the following:

Accurate layout and construction of interior partitions (mostly metal frame with gypsum board) including accurate hollow metal door and window frame installation.

Installation of suspended ceiling systems (be knowledgeable and adaptable in creative ways to suspend ceilings very crowded/limited space between the grid and the structure/attachment points above)

Accurate door hanging and adjusting

Accurate cabinet installation

Gypsum board finishing

Installation of sheet flooring such as resilient vinyl, etc.

Vinyl Composite Tile installation

Ceramic Tile installation

Rolled Carpet installation

Carpet Tile installation

Painting (including preparation)

Assorted hardware and lock installation


For more information or guidance email info@diplocon.com and/or sign up to join our email community and we will be glad to help.


Greg



Feb
28

Working outside of the USA

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Although I enjoy traveling and living in cultures outside the USA, there are times when I get that “There’s no place like home” feeling and think I would like to find a job in the States. When I look in local job listings or even the big nationwide sites and see the wages or salaries being advertised as “good pay” or “high wages” I am quickly reminded that I would have to take a huge pay cut, and lose some of my excellent benefits, just to take a chance on a job that may be only temporary. I quickly come back to reality and appreciate the opportunities that are presented to me working outside the USA.

When you see an Internet “news” article touting some position that pays “as much as” $40,000 per year, think double that amount overseas. There are also opportunities that may not pay double your current wage or salary, but compensate by providing storybook surroundings and cultures to explore and experience. There are even plenty of locations that can offer the best of both situations

To say there are high paying, steady, overseas jobs for us regular folks is no exaggeration. I should know. I’m pretty much an average guy, and, do not have a college degree; but I’ve been working steady for over ten years – and except for one year on a small Pacific island with tropical weather, jungle, and warm clear ocean – have earned at least double what I would have paid at home.

There are plenty of empty positions to be filled (not to mention a lot of “dead wood” that needs to be removed and replaced by motivated folks like you.) It may be that all you would need to do to get there is tweak your skills a bit and know how to look for the jobs.

During the Spring of 2011this blog will focus on ideas for tradespeople, supervisors, managers, and even those with little experience in the work force to date, to turn their current skill set into a marketable package that could help them double their income overnight by working overseas.

Over a few weeks we will examine the skills below. You may find that you (or someone you know) might qualify to, or be close to qualified to, fill a position in:

Construction trades

Engineering disciplines

Construction managers

Administrative and clerical

Construction Security

Telecom Technicians

Locksmiths

Technical Security Technicians

8a small or disadvantaged business contracting

Teaching

Mechanics and equipment maintenance technicians

Airframe and power plant techs

Information Technology Technicians

Computer Programmers

It may be your time to make your way in the wider world of overseas jobs. Even if you don’t see an obvious reference to your line of work in the list above, email us at info@diplocon.com and suggest your current skills as a topic for discussion on this blog, or, in private if you choose.



Feb
23

Thinking twice about Mexico in 2011

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A couple of years ago I blogged “Mexico is getting a bad rap”, and at the time it was. The newsies along the US side of the border were sensationalizing and in general doing poor reporting – at least from my point of view living on the other side at the time. Since then the cartels have become extremely ruthless and brutal, and have killed several US citizens, something that was unheard of in 2008 when I posted that blog.

As a subcriber to Stratfor (right side of the page you are reading this on), I get straight intelligence, not sensationalized stories from hack news novelists. Stratfor has been proactively searching for the facts about Mexico’s cartel on cartel, and, cartel on government violence, and sending it out to members in the form of security reports – not news stories meant to shock, or, persuade readers that the problems in Mexico are all the fault of the US as some politicians on both sides of the border want us to believe.

Based on solid information (but not as one living on the other side as I have completed my assignents in Mexico and moved on), in my opinion in 2011, Mexico is getting hazardous and one should perform due dilligence and assess the situation before accepting an assignment there.

Greg

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